Italy

Dish

Prosciutto is a dry-cured ham that is usually thinly sliced and served uncooked; this style is called prosciutto crudo in Italian and is distinguished from cooked ham, prosciutto cotto. Commonly associated with Friuli and Emilia, the most renowned and expensive legs of prosciutto come from central and northern Italy, such as those of Parma, and San Daniele, in Friuli-Venezia Giulia. The production of genuine Parma Ham is the story of a special relationship between man, nature and location. Since Roman times, the unique conditions of the Parma region have made it possible to produce the highest quality hams that have been appreciated by gourmets for centuries. 'Prosciutto' is from the Latin 'perexsuctum' meaning 'dried' - an indication of the purity of Parma Ham production and its ancient roots. It was in 100 BC that Cato the “Censor” first mentioned the extraordinary flavour of the air cured ham made around the town of Parma in Italy; the legs were left to dry, greased with a little oil and could age without spoiling. A tasty meat was obtained which could be eaten over a period of time while maintaining its pleasant flavour. Proscuitto is not a product that you can prepare at home so we suggest that you but authentic proscuitto di parma from an Italian deli and try it at home. It can be used in hundreds of dishes or in simple salads. Here’s a favourite: Wrap slices of proscuitto around pieces of sweet melon and eat with your fingers.